Throwback Thursday: Exeter Respect 2012

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We have an annual festival in Exeter called the ‘Respect Festival’ which celebrates the city’s diversity. Way back in 2012 I’d help set up ‘Resident Writers’ and we did ‘flag poetry’ The idea was that there were different words written on the ‘flags’. Everyone was given five flags, and then had the option of adding three more words to create their poem.

My poem read: Love Means The Time Given to Ghosts

 

 

My Path to Publication

Geri meets Aggy

The publishing world has undergone a rapid shift in recent years, even in the time since I dipped my toes into the ocean of books, agents, ebooks etc. However, I’m often asked how I got my work published so I thought I’d share my story in case it helps someone else on their journey to publication and a few tips based on my experiences.

I’ve always written. One of my first memories was of sitting with my cousin, writing a very long and protracted story. I can’t remember all the details but I do remember it ran to about eight pages, quite a feat as I was only about 7years old! At college I’d written for our local paper and had written some short stories for myself. When hubby and I decided to take a gap year, I decided that would be the perfect time for me to get that novel out.

I remember writing the opening chapters to what would become ‘Akane: Last of the Orions‘ while on a beach in Brazil. Reading it to hubby, he was excited and I was keen to learn what happened to Akane and her friends but it would be another few years before I had finished the novel. In the meantime I undertook the London School of Journalism’s Creative Writing Course which gave me some useful guidelines and helpful feedback from the tutors. I also worked on a few pieces featuring animals and people we’d met on our travels. In theory I’d love to publish them one day, but I know they’ll stay safely in my computer.

I completed ‘Akane: Last of the Orions‘ as part of a National Novel Writing Month challenge but it needed a LOT of work. As an aside, if you’ve not completed NaNoWriMo before and are an aspiring writer, give it a go. It’s a fun challenge which can set you up with some good writing practices.

When we returned to the UK I decided to try and sell some of my work. I attended a writers conference ‘FantasyCon’ and was bombarded with information – ways to get an agent, ways to self-publish your books, reasons not to have an agent, self-branding, writing for YA, ensuring your book will be the ‘next big thing’. It was frankly too much and everyone I met had an opinion on how to do it ‘correctly’. I left slightly more confused than when I arrived, but filled with ideas. I had also met some funny, interesting and people who would ultimately help me on my writing journey.

I’d got chatting to Adele Wearing the first night of the conference and she contacted me a few weeks later to discuss a project she was putting together. That was the start of ‘The Girls Guide to Surviving the Apocalypse‘. It was a really fun project, one I hold very dear, and which allowed me to try different writing styles, from tongue-in-cheek articles, to opinion pieces, to short stories. It also gave me the confidence to submit my stories to websites and I’m still very happy that I won the poll on Fantasy Faction for my short story ‘The Last Dragon Keeper’.

My interest in writing grew and I helped to set up ‘Resident Writers’ which prompted me to write an assortment of pieces, including poetry which is definitely not my forte! I continued submitting to different websites In the meantime, Adele had decided to collate and publish a book called ‘Tales of the Nun and Dragon‘ and asked if I would like to submit. My short story ‘Into the Woods’ was accepted and I really enjoyed writing all the blood and guts. ‘Tales of the Nun and Dragon’ was well-received and launched at the next FantasyCon, with Adele deciding to set up Fox Spirit Books soon after. Further titles from Fox Spirit Books followed and Adele kindly agreed to publish my collection of short stories, Weird Wild, which included an adapted version of ‘Into the Woods’. The following year ‘Akane: Last of the Orions‘ was also published by Fox Spirit Books. All the while, I continued submitting my work, sometimes successfully, sometimes not so and writing on my blog.

I had a bit of a break when the toddler was born. The voices were still there, demanding attention, but not surprisingly there was a louder, more demanding voice who needed me, so my notebooks and ideas were put away. Although I still wrote a little, I had become rusty and my old website became slightly redundant. I briefly returned to work, but for a variety of reasons, decided to leave my job and devote myself to raising our daughter, trying my hand at crafting and focussing on my writing. In 2016 I took on the role of ‘Commissioning Editor’ for ‘Fennec Books’ an imprint of Fox Spirit Books and soon after my first pre-teen novel ‘Ghoulsome Graveyard‘ was published. I’m planning next year to try self-publishing so pop back regularly to see how that’s going and I’m also submitting to different magazines and publications, with a short story appearing in the June edition of Sirens Call.

So I’m by no means an ‘expert’ on getting published. My path is very different to other authors – I’ve met people who have agents but who have no books currently in print and others who’ve lots of work either self-published or published through small presses, I’ve met people who use Patreon and others who only show their work to family. However, I have a few suggestions (in no particular order) if you want to your your work out there.

 

  1. Firstly, make sure your MS is ready for publication. Get others to read it and offer suggestions (it’s up to you if you accept them). Check, then check again for grammar and spelling mistakes (you never get them all but sending something filled with mistakes with get your MS rejected as agents don’t have the time to sort your laziness).
  2. Sounds daft but be passionate about your book when discussing it. If you’re not excited, how will anyone else be?
  3. Ive been told that you need a minimum of 10k followers on Twitter, as well as an author page on Facebook. I’d agree and disagree about needing 10k followers on Twitter. I’ve met established writers who struggle to make 1000! However, most publishers or agents are looking for some sort of online presence and Twitter is great for that. Few pointers – it’s SOCIAL media. Don’t spam people with ‘buy my book’ ads-nothing will get you blocked faster. Engage with people and make it fun. I tweet about books (and promote my own) but also chat with people about movies, crafts, dogs, anything really.
  4. A blog is also helpful as it gets you writing regularly and improves your writing but you need to keep it up to date, which is why I took mine down after having my daughter as I didn’t have time to maintain it and it looked a bit shabby and unloved. Websites are easy to set up and you can make it engaging by inviting blog-hops (where others contribute content. I do interviews with inspirational women who had interesting jobs or were challenging the establishment) or a regular item – I do ‘Make It Monday’ and movie reviews. On my old website, in the run up to an anthology I was in being published, I did a month of promo, inviting contributions, which was really fun & got word out there about the antho but it was hard work coordinating so many submissions and getting them all scheduled so it’s not for the faint-hearted. Facebook is a good media but a) think about your audience – for example it’s not the preferred social media for under 25’s or over 60’s so may not reach your target audience and b) I struggle with private/public so some authors keep separate accounts (I personally don’t bother). There’s also Instagram which I’m learning to use and Snapchat as well as Reddit and more popping up regularly. All have their pros and cons. Whichever you choose, post regularly, engage with people and don’t spam!
  5. I’d recommend going to writing conferences. There are many which are genre specific (Romance, World Con, and FantasyCon are a few which spring to mind but there’s loads). I was lucky and met some great people at these conferences, who I’m happy to say are now friends. My first conference I met a lot of wannabe authors and it sounds awful but they smelled of desperation – they were buying agents drinks and generally sucking up to everyone. One man actually turned his back on my husband as soon as he learned he wasn’t in ‘the biz’. So just get chatting to people and you never know who you’ll meet. (We did the awards dinner and I accidentally sat next to an agent who after chatting about tv shows etc offered to read my novel.) These conferences are also great for learning more about getting published or just about your favourite authors or subjects so go and enjoy.
  6. Agents. There are a lot of pros and cons about agents. In theory they get your book into the hands of publishers faster, sort contracts and generally look after you. However, I know authors signed to an agent who haven’t sold any of their manuscripts so it’s up to you. If you’re going to approach an agent, check their submission guidelines CAREFULLY. Nothing will get your MS thrown into the slush pile faster than sending it in Word and they wanted it in Pages or set out incorrectly. This sounds simple but don’t send it to a wrong agent. Like readers, agents have their own interest areas so I wouldn’t send my horror story to a romance agent – it’s wasting both our time. As I said, follow guidelines and be polite – Twitter is filled with authors sending snotty replies to agents who they feel have taken too long or rejected their work. Publishing is a small world and you don’t need that sort of negativity against your name. You’re trying to sell your books, but also yourself so acting like a child throwing a tantrum is not professional. If they reject, say thanks for their time and that’s it. Take on board any suggestions they may make. If you want an agent, keep going – they receive hundreds of manuscripts a month so yours needs to really stand out.
  7. If you get an agent, or work with a small press, read the small print of any contract – check about foreign rights, who gets what if it’s sold to TV or movies, rights for audiobooks, how long you’re entering into the contract and who gets the rights to our work when it ends, who pays for editing and formatting, and what type of publishing will they do (print or eformat).
  8. Which brings me to small presses and self publishing. Some people dismiss these as vanity presses but in recent years they’ve been putting out some good work. As with agents, follow their submission guidelines and also check their contracts as above. For example my contract means my publisher gets the rights to print and e-format for a year, then all rights return to me & I can sell it elsewhere if I want. They’re fantastic for new authors, but their budgets are small so be prepared to do a lot of self-promotion.
  9. I’d also recommend getting your name out there by submitting short stories & articles to magazines. A lot aren’t accepting submissions from unknowns anymore (eg Women’s Own used to do periodical mags just of fiction but I think they’ve stopped them now) but there’s loads of online places to submit. As above, check guidelines, proof your submission and write a good story.

These are only a few suggestions, if you’ve got more (and I’m sure you do!), let me know in the comments below.

A Father’s Love

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On a rare ‘date night’ (that’s two sleepy parents who’ve managed to get the toddler to bed at a decent time) hubby and I watched the latest Beauty & the Beast. It’s been a looooong time since I saw the original animation (in the cinema, with my BFF, Karen something) and I was amazed that I remembered all the songs. When it was announced, I’d had mixed feelings about making a live-action of Beauty and the Beast, I mean, what could it add to the original, which won Academy Awards, Grammy’s and Golden Globes? However, I was pleasantly surprised by it’s quality and I really enjoyed the small changes Emma Watson brought to ‘Belle’. For those who’ve seen it, I’m sure you’ll agree that Luke Evans as Gaston and Josh Gad as LeFou completely steal the show but the other thing which struck me was the relationship between Belle’s father.

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People will argue that the Beast, or even Belle herself, is the hero of this movie (certainly in the updated version, Belle is more than capable of handling herself) but I have to argue that the unacknowledged hero of both movies is actually Maurice, Belle’s father. I thought on Father’s Day it seemed apt to look at this Daddy’s Girl and what a Daddy’s love for his daughter.

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*SPOILERS AHEAD*

One of the main differences between the animated and live action movies is that Belle is the inventor, not Maurice, who is an artist. This obviously plays out later, to explain why Belle’s such an outcast and Maurice is considered ‘unusual’, but whether she’s reading a book, inventing a washing machine or generally discussing what she wants to do with her life, Maurice supports her. He agrees, it’s HER life to do with as she chooses. beauty-and-the-beast-disneyscreencaps-com-910.jpg

I suppose having a daughter myself now, and seeing the encouragement my husband gives her daily (if there’s a higher branch to climb, he’ll tell her to do it, but always makes sure she knows he’s there if she falls) this really struck me. In how many other Disney movies, or movies in general, does the father give unconditional encouragement to his daughter’s dreams and ideas, especially when they run so contrary to the expectations of society. There are not that many which spring to mind.

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Maurice loves his daughter, that’s obvious but for me it’s shown in the number of sacrifices he’s willing to make for her. In the live action movie, there’s a scene explaining what happened to Belle’s mother and how Maurice was forced to leave Paris for his daughter’s safety during a plague outbreak, choosing to settle in the country to ensure her health. He had to leave his beloved wife behind, to die alone and this is played with nuance by Kevin Kline. So there’s poor Maurice, having to care for an infant whilst also grieving for his wife and his life in Paris, whilst settling in a village with locals who consider him more than a little strange and are not the most welcoming.


However, the ultimate sacrifice Maurice makes is when Gaston asks, then demands, Belle’s hand in marriage. Each time Maurice says no, even though he knows it may cost him his freedom, even his life. He loves his daughter so much, her safety and happiness is paramount to him, and he does what’s best for her without a second though as to what it will cost him. Can you imagine a greater love? It’s one thing to sacrifice your life, and certainly that’s been portrayed numerous times in films (think the mum in Findig Nemo), but to allow yourself to in institutionalised whilst sane and worrying about your daughters safety, that’s a fathers love. He’s the ultimate, unsung (I think he really is, as he’s about the only one without a theme) hero of the story.


So, what’s th e post of this slightly rambling post? Well, it’s a Fathers Dat, a day to acknowledge all the sacrifices, both little and big that our father’s make for us – be it working a job they hate in order to pay for things for their children, sharing their cake after a little one drops theirs, even getting up early to take the children downstairs so us mums can have a much-needed lay in. I watch my husband with our daughter – he’s constantly striving to be a better dad, to push her to be the best she can and ignore anyone who tells her what she can’t do.  He’s as fierce a feminist as I am. He has a level of patience I envy and loves getting stuck in with the toddlers latest game, be it a tea party for her imaginary friends or going on a bear hunt, he’s by her side and she adores him for it. He gets up in the night to chase away monsters and as soon as he gets home is dragged into games which he throws itself into without a thought of how exhausted he as. His only reward is a cheeky smile, raspberry blown at him & the ultimate ‘love you, daddy!’ As the toddler flings her arms around his neck. He’s mostly definitely hers, mine & the pups hero. 

How are you celebrating Father’s Day? 

The Last Dragon Keeper

Dragon-Avatar

When I was first venturing into writing, I started submitting to different competitions. ‘The Last Dragon Keeper’ was submitted to the Fantasy Faction Writing Competition way back in 2012. I was amazed that people voted for it and I ended up winning that month! I keep planning to return to this world, with Eui and her brother Rowan and their voices have become a little more demanding of late, so you never know. Here it is ‘The Last Dragon Keeper’…..

The Last Dragon Keeper

Eui watched as the waves surged towards the shore. Ice had formed on the water, the motion turning it to mush as it covered the smooth grey rocks that acted as boundary between land and sea. She wrapped her arms around herself, trying but failing to keep out the wind which threatened to tear her clothes and pick at her bones. She knew that her mother would scold her for forgetting her jacket but in her desperation to get out of the house, she had left it, stowed snugly in her wardrobe. Eui stamped her feet to try and warm them but the wind kept forcing it’s way through her thick boots, biting her toes.

The ground began to shake. It started with a slow trickle of the smaller rocks which quickly blended with the mush of the ocean water. The larger rocks began to vibrate then roll down the hill and into the water. Eui stood her ground as rocks large and small snapped at her heels, flinching as the larger ones bruised her. Eui breathed deeply, inhaling the familiar ash scent which covered the island more deeply than the perma-snow.

The earth juddered to a stop and Eui carefully stepped out of the pile of stones which covered her feet. The icy slush boiled along the shore then all was still once more. Eui turned as she heard footsteps crunching on the gravel and smiled at her father.

‘Your mother is worried about you,’ he said, not looking her in the eye but focussing on the ocean.

‘I’m sorry. I shouldn’t have said what I did.’ Eui risked a look at her father but could not read his expression. The silence settled over them, only slightly comfortable.

Finally, taking a deep breath, Eui said, ‘The dragons are dying father.’

‘As are we, Eui, as are we. We can only hope that they die before we do. A dragon alone in this world, without a Keeper, would soon fall prey to the blades of the Sagar.’

If they’re lucky, thought Eui, but she did not pursue the matter. Every Keeper knew the challenges faced by the dragons. The Sagars were hunters who sold dragon meat and their scales and teeth which held magical properties. For over a generation they had hunted and killed dragons, depleting their numbers in an unending quest for the perfect hunt: A mythical beast, defined by its purity and beauty. With each retelling of the myth, the dragon grew in grace and size until Eui, who had been told stories of the Sagar which had kept her awake at night, did not recognise the creature as being a dragon but an animal of pure virtue. Knowing no dragon had ever been born matching the myth kept the Sagars hunting and Eui from peaceful dreams.

However, the biggest threat was the dragons themselves. Females would lay between 15-20 eggs and would continually defend her nest from attacks by males. Of the eggs which survived, not all would hatch, with some being trampled. Finally the female, tired and undernourished, would die. If she was lucky, she might see the one or two of her offspring who would emerge from their eggs, snorting flames and growling to be fed.

In the absence of a mother, when the infant dragons smashed from their eggs, they would bond with a Keeper. The Keepers were almost as old as the dragons themselves but they to had slowly grown fewer and fewer until Eui and her brother Rowan were the only none bonded keepers. The last surviving female was guarding her egg, waiting to die.

‘It’s a very special time for your brother. He will be bonded, probably today,’ said her father, his eyes remaining on the waves.

‘And what about me?’ asked Eui. ‘A keeper with nothing to keep.’

‘Is that why you wish to leave?’ Eui flashed a quick look at her father. He would claim that it was the wind which brought tears to his eyes, but the clench in Eui’s stomach reminded her of the argument with her mother.

‘There is a world beyond the isle, father. I wish to explore and there is nothing here for me. There will be no more dragons once this has hatched and bonded with Rowan. A keeper with nothing to keep,’ Eui’s eyes flooded with tears which threatened to fall. Her father swung an arm around her and gently pulled her close for a brisk hug.

‘Come, Eui. They are preparing for the ceremony. I have to get to the Great Hall. Greeson and the elders are waiting for me.’ Together they walked slowly up the beach, slipping occasionally on the loose gravel. Kissing her on the head before gently pushing her towards the settlement, Eui’s father walked towards the mountain. Suddenly he called Eui and she ran to him as the wind stole his words.

‘Eui, Keepers are like the seasons. We are currently in the darkest winter we have known, filled with darkness and despair but after the winter, the spring warmth always comes. Remember, your name means spring in the old tongue. Wait, and you will see the beauty when we emerge from the darkness. I know you feel there is nothing for you here, but your brother will need your support and love. Being a Keeper is not easy and he still has a lot to learn.’

Eui gave her father a small smile, then turned and jogged into the settlement, flinging open the door. Her mother looked up from where she was sat by the table, her sewing needle raised. She regarded Eui with a stony expression.

Eui paused, looking contrite under the glare of her mother. ‘Father said you might need some help preparing for the ceremony,’ she said finally.

Her mother carefully laid down her needle. She studied the garments laid out across the table then quietly said, ‘Go and wake your brother. He needs to get dressed. The ceremony starts soon. The egg is hatching.’

Eui dipped her head and avoided eye contact with her mother as she wound around the large table and up the stairs. Launching into her brother’s room, she jumped onto his bed, bouncing up and down.

‘Wakey, wakey,’ she called as Rowan swatted at her.

‘Get off,’ he shouted as Eui continued jumping.

‘Mother says you have to get up. The ceremony is going to start soon so you need to get into your dress,’ teased Eui.

‘It’s a robe,’ roared Rowan, sitting up and pushing Eui off of the bed. She landed with cat-like grace, giving him a smug smile.

‘Whatever. The eggs hatching. You’re about to become a Keeper.’

‘Yeah,’ said Rowan without enthusiasm, pulling a t-shirt from the floor and sniffing it. Deciding it didn’t smell, he dragged it over his head, then ran his fingers through his hair.

Eui watched her brother. Three years older than her thirteen, his training made him appear older but seeing him first thing in the morning always reminded Eui of how young her brother really was.

Playfully kicking him, she ran from the room, calling ‘Your dress is on the table. Hurry up or I might spill my breakfast on it.’

Eui charged into the kitchen, Rowan a few paces behind. They both stopped when they saw their mother’s stern face.

‘Hurry up,’ their mother said, handing Rowan his robe. Smoothing her hair, she stood a little straighter and scowled at her children. ‘I will see you at the Great Hall,’ she said, leaving them.

Eui grinned at her brother. Rowan ignored her and carefully picked up the robes his mother had spent weeks embroidering. Slipping the delicate fabric over his head, he felt it cascade down his body. Checking the sleeves were straight, he tugged at the hem. Eui bit her cheeks to stop from laughing while Rowan slipped into his boots.

‘It’s a robe,’ he growled. Eui couldn’t contain herself and started laughing. Looking down at himself, Rowan sighed, then he started giggling. ‘Ok, it’s a dress. Can we go? I have a dragon to meet.’

Together they walked from the settlement towards the Great Hall, Rowan complaining about the cold and the snow getting into his boots. Entering the cave that would take them to the Great Hall they could hear the Elders singing, and the pained final breaths of the female dragon. The Great Hall was a large cave which had formed in the mountain, decorated by generations of Keepers. There were designs showing the bonding ceremony, the history of the keepers and dragons, with some designs used to train young keepers.

Eui and Rowan joined their parents, stood on a large platform just above the pit where the dragon rested with her last remaining egg. The female dragon was large, her scales a burnt orange turning to red on her belly and yellow on her wings. Her breath was shallow and laboured and the keepers knew that it would not be long before she would join her brethren in the flame halls of the underworld.

Eui stole a peek at the egg. It was about the size of a boulder, with mottled brown spots and she heard the frustrated squeaks as it’s occupier nosed its way out. The Elders stood on the opposite platform, their chants rising and falling with the breaths of the female. The large dragon’s head drooped, rose, then fell again.

Greeson silenced the Elders with a raised hand. ‘She has passed to the underworld,’ he said.

No one made a sound as they watched the dragon ease its nose, then it’s body and finally its long tail from the egg. It opened its mouth and coughed, sending a ball of flame harmlessly against the wall. Shaking itself its wings unfurled and the Keepers stood amazed. The baby dragon’s body was a paler colour than it’s mothers but its wings were pure white, veins highlighted in golden scales which caught the light. Shaking its head, it emitted a small bark before experimentally flapping its wings. Its dark green eyes took in the unmoving body of its mother before it spotted Rowan stood on the platform. Another flap of its wings and it was eye level with the platform, barking happily.

The Elders began chanting in the ancient tongue. Eui did not understand all the words but knew it was the song to encourage the dragon to choose its Keeper. Rowan grinned as the dragon looked at him and bowed deeply as he had been taught. The dragon started to dip its head when it caught sight of Eui behind Rowan. Cocking its head to one side it forgot to move its wings, flapping quickly as it began to fall. Rowan remained bowed, but his mother shifted nervously. Rowan dared to peek and frowned when he saw that the dragon was not returning his bow. Finally he stood and looked at his father, who shrugged his confusion.

Standing, Rowan blocked the dragons view of Eui. The dragon craned his neck to look around the boy. Eui looked back wide-eyed back at the creature floating effortlessly before stepping past Rowan and raising her hand towards the dragon.

The dragon swooped close, it’s sudden movement causing Eui to step back in surprise until the dragons long black tongue flicked out, licking her hand. Eui giggled, running her hand along the dragon’s muzzle as it growled contentedly.

‘The dragon has chosen it’s Keeper,’ called Greeson, his voice echoing.

Eui stopped playing with the dragon as the words struck her like a physical blow. She looked at Rowan, his face contorted with anger, her mother with her hand covering her mouth in shock and finally her father who was smiling at her. Stepping forward he lifted Eui onto the dragon’s back. Eui hugged the dragon’s neck as it rose and circled the Great Hall.

‘Spring has come with the last Dragon Keeper,’ Eui’s father said.

 

If you’ve enjoyed this story, why not check out my other works, including my novels ‘Akane: The Last of the Orions‘, ‘Weird Wild‘ and my children’s book ‘Ghoulsome Graveyard‘.

My Top 12 Books

As is a usual event in our house, last night’s dinner convo revolved around which books we’d take with us in the event of an apocalypse (what can I say? Apocalypse Girls for life!). There’s a number of books I always have a copy of when we travel, and favourites I haven’t read for ages but still love, and ones which I’ve only read once but stuck with me. All this book chat got me thinking: what would be your definitive 12 books on your bookcase? 

A long conversation with hubby ensued as we shared favourite books, battled over whose list was the better and made promises to read the others list. However, the one thing which struck me about the conversation wasn’t necessarily our choices, but the reasons for them: while we discussed the book genres, memorable characters and the achievements of the authors the thing we talked about mostly was how the book made us feel, the memories it brought up, of friends we had shared the book with and family who had read it to us. It was a challenging but really fun chat so I’m sharing a few of my ‘bookshelf 12’ with you. For the sake of my sanity, I’ve not included anthologies, although a number of the Fox Pockets would make the list, along with ‘Girl At The End of the World‘ by Fox Spirit Books. 


The Princess Bride by William Goldman. I remember being off sick from work with horrible sinusitis. I’d watched all our DVD’s when hubby suggested I try ‘The Princess Bride’. I fell instantly in love so was ecstatic when he bought me a copy of the book just before we got married. It’s a book with it all: romance, adventure, sword fighting, fantasy and witty dialogue. One of the few books whose movie is worthy of it.


Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allen Poe. I’ve got a lovely old copy of Poe’s book. I remember buying it in a second hand bookshop in Bournemouth where you have to rummage through mountains of books before finding a treasure (or two!). Again, while I love the book and it’s given me many happy hours reading, it’s the memory of chatting with the elderly bookshop owner: the smell of his tobacco mixing with the musty books which fills my mind as I turn the first page.


Sabriel by Garth Nix. It was the white cover which drew me to this book and it was the first book by Nix that I read. However I was soon looking out for more of his work and was desperate for the sequels to be published. For me, books two and three never fulfilled the potential of the first which, if I’m honest, is one of the reasons I love and write fantasy novels now. 

Poison Study by Maria V Snyder. This was leant to me after a random conversation with an acquaintance on the phone. Ok, it’s not what you’d call ‘high class literature’ but the story and world-building is good, making it the perfect just-before-bed-book.

Skullduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy. I’m going to cheat and say that I love all six (am awaiting number seven to come out in paperback) and would have them all on my shelf. Mixing the real world with that of magic, quirky but relatable characters and fabulous dialogue, for me these are a must read for genre fans of all ages (although hubby would disagree!)

Skeleton Crew by Stephen King. It’s a tough choice with King novels. There’s so many to choose from and everybody has their own favourites. However, Skeleton Crew contains some of my favourite short stories by King, including the amazing ‘The Mist’ which was adapted into a pretty good (for a King novel) film (although I think the film had a better ending!). 

PS I Love You by Celia Ahern. I stayed up late reading this book and by about page five I was sobbing so hard, I woke hubby up. Ahern’s books really tap an emotional valve and the concept of finding love after the love of your life dies is dealt with beautifully.

The Tale of Benjamin Bunny by Beatrix Potter. A naughty little bunny, swaggering around a forbidden garden until he inevitably gets into trouble. I love all of Potter’s characters but there was always something about the cheeky and willful Benjamin that I loved the most.

Stark by Ben Elton. I always enjoy Elton’s take on popular culture but my favourite quote comes from this, his first novel: ‘What IS the point anyway?’ It’s a question I ask frequently.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. Don’t Panic! Earth is about to be blown up by aliens in order to make way for a galactic bypass. Arthur Dent, possibly literature’s most hilarious anti-hero, travels the galaxy with his friend Ford Prefect, Zaphod Beeblebrox, love interest Trillian and depressed android Marvin. Hilarious stuff packed with educational tid-bits to rival a book penned by a royal sibling. I know where my towel is, do you? 

Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien. Do I really need to say why? 

I’m going to save my last spot because I’m hoping one of you will share your favourites and inspire me! Im missing some good female authors so who would you suggest?
Do you agree with my list? What are your favourite books? Which books bring happiest memories? Feel free to add some of your own in the comments section!

The Forgotten

A bit of flash fiction to enjoy with your Saturday. This was written a while ago as part of a speed-writing challenge and when I was still working for a hospital, which obviously influenced the content. I saw the hard work of the nursing staff and how often their contributions went unnoticed by others and frankly, hospitals after hours are CREEPY, very quiet despite all the people bustling around. Not going to lie, it’s not my usual style but I always aim to challenge myself in my writing so hope you like it.

The Forgotten

We are the forgotten. We drift these halls unseen, day and night. We hear them calling, crying out, begging for mercy. But we are powerless to end their suffering. How we wish we could take their pain from them, pull it into ourselves and save them from their fate but that is not within our power and so we continue our eternal vigil. 
One of them is weeping in the corner. We glide by, but know that even our gentlest touch will be of no help: where they are they cannot be comforted by us. Another is crying out for water. We move, but there is somebody already there, helping them drink. 
Many people complain of the smell but we have been here so long we do not even notice it: the mix of blood, urine, chemicals and drugs can burn the noses of even the most devout veteran but for us it is nothing. It clings to us, penetrates us, is one with us. 
Another whimper from one of the beds. We do not move, waiting to see if it grows into a full cry or dies out to a whisper. A hush. This is often far worse than a louder noise and can only foreshadow a bleak end. We move closer, offering soothing noises which mean nothing. Wide eyes greet us, a tremor of the lip and a small mew. They see us but do not recognise us, or fully register we are here. So often we are ignored but we are the ones there at the beginning and the end. Looking down we know it is nearly their time. We smile kindly until the last of the tremors have passed, and their eyes close. They are at peace. 
A clatter and padding of unclothed feet tells us we are needed. With one final look we turn and drift away.

A Foxy Birthday

 

Wow! It’s been FIVE years since the ‘Fearless Genre Warriors’ of Fox Spirit Books flooffed their foxy tails and launched with ‘Tales of the Nun and Dragon’. They’ve been kind enough to accept a number of both my novels and short stories. If you like my work, here’s a list of what’s available through Fox Spirit Books (also, go check out their other authors, they truly do produce some of the most interesting, genre busting and clever work).

Tales of the Nun and Dragon collected by Adele Wearing featuring my short ‘Into the Woods’. This was my first publication and I was soooooo excited! (still am!)Nun and Dragon.jpg

Weird Wild by G Clark Hellery (cover by @redfacedmonkey)

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Akane: The Last of the Orions by G Clark Hellery (possibly my favourite cover by @redfacedmonkey)

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Ghoulsome Graveyard by G Clark Hellery (cover by @redfacedmonkey)

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Tales of the Fox and the Fae collected by Adele Wearing featuring my short story ‘The Fox and the Fae’

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Girl at the End of the World featuring my short story ‘Somebody to Play With’ ( I love this wrap cover)

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Fox Pockets: Missing Monarchs featuring my short story ‘The Blooding’

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Fox Pockets: Guardians featuring my short story ‘The Guardian’

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Fox Pockets: Under the Waves featuring my short story ‘The Blue Planet’

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Fox Pockets: Reflections featuring my short story ‘All the Fun Of the Fayre’

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Eve of War featuring my short story ‘Born’ (side note: this was the first piece of writing I did since having my daughter and I think the hormones came out in the writing).

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