Make It Monday: String Letters

As Summer in the UK, you can never tell what the weather will do. One particularly dull day, I was trying to think what to do with the assorted ends of my knitting. As part of my ‘reduce, reuse, recycle’ pledge for Earth Day, I normally add them to the ‘rag bag’ which I donate to the local charity shop, but suddenly inspiration struck, the Lamb and I would turn it into art!

This was possibly one of the easiest, although muckiest, projects we’ve undertaken and the results were as fun as the making!

We started off by drawing an outline of our chosen design on greaseproof paper, an ‘E’ for the Lamb and I thought I’d get a head start on some of our Halloween decorations so I wrote ‘Boo’.

Then came the fun part! We soaked the assorted wool remnants in the glue water, then draping it around the paper. I wrung the wool a little, while the Lamb popped it on still dripping. Aside from excess liquid, neither method affected the final result. Longer pieces were used to create an outline while the others were layered inside. We both really liked the blends of colours.

And here’s the final result! Super spooky!

 

Movie review: Darkness (2002)

Director: Juame Balaguero

Starring: Anna Paquin, Lena Olin and Iain Glen

Synopsis: A family move from the city to the country but there’s more than mice roaming their new home and making things go bump in the night.

Review: So, your average 2.4 family moves to the country into a large gothic style house. It’s not long before the children start noticing strange things going on, (the parents become angry for no reason, the beast under the bed steals colouring pencils, the little boy is doing the same gruesome drawings over and over again etc.) but as usual all their fears are dismissed by those older and wiser.

It’s a slow-build movie, which I’m normally a fan of. However, with a slow-build the reason they are enjoyable is because you grow to like the characters yet there’s not much to like as they are all two-dimensional. The mother is distant, while the father goes from loving to aggressive in moments while the young boy scribbles drawings with his pencils. And then there’s the teenage daughter, played by Paquin. As an actress I like Paquin and I think she brings a depth to her characters like few actresses her age can, but in this, there are too many cliches for her to battle against (honestly, there’s only so many times you can say ‘It’s this house’ in a breathless manner before people become annoyed).

There’s also an eclectic mix of accents in the movie which was one thing I found really distracting about this movie (it’s the little things which annoy me), including Iain Glen’s poor attempts at an American (?) accent. If part of the storyline was he was estranged from his father and moved to a new country, why couldn’t it have been England where his weird accent wouldn’t have been noticed? And also, if you lived in a house which suffered so many electric failures, wouldn’t you carry a torch with you all the time?

A few glimpses of spectral figures, a record player which starts playing on its own, prank ghostly telephone calls and a grim warning from an old man are not enough to spooky stakes. It’s slow, boring and the twist in the tale is obvious after about 10minutes.

What price for my soul?

I’ve worked at a number of temporary jobs, some good, some bad, some I couldn’t run out of quickly enough and others where I’ve made amazing friends. I’ve managed to use many of my experiences in my writing (one character in The Vampire’s Bodyguard’ is a culmination of all the horrid people I’ve worked for, including one who said ‘I’m not going to bother to learn your name as you won’t be here long enough for me to use it!’ I was offered a permanent job and went on to become her manager). During one particularly unpleasant assignment, I wrote this poem.

What Price for My Soul

What price for my soul

Job that takes without giving

People without humour

Mind numbing tedium

No explanation given

In this colourless land

The grim overlord

With whipping glare

I know the price for my time

But no matter what you do

You’ll not have my soul

Because I will escape

Perhaps to new overlord

Or lands unknown

But always to my writing

Where words are my soul

Movie review: The Reaping (2007)

Director: Stephen Hopkins

Starring: Hillary Swank, David Morrissey, Idris Elba

Synopsis: A grieving widow and mother debunks miracles until she’s called to a town experiencing the great plagues

Review: Way back in 2007, I’d not really heard of Idris Elba, with David Morrissey yet to terrorise survivors in The Walking Dead and Hillary Swank was the big name draw for this movie. So it was  a pleasant surprise to see so many recognisable faces during a recent rewatch.

Swank plays ‘Catherine’ who has a convoluted back story relating to being a minister who lost her family while acting as a missionary in Sudan. Her story is very contrived and for me pulls the movie down. The constant flash-backs to her time there pull you out of the movie and in my opinion do not add to her story or explain her actions. I would have found her a stronger character had she have been firmly a scientist, seeking to disprove ‘miracles’ like Sigourney Weaver in ‘Red Lights’. Elba is slightly misused throughout, although his devotion to Swank is clear, although it’s never explained why. Morrissey is restrained, with flashes of his character from Walking Dead seen.

Some scenes seem overly long while others are drenched in colours which make it difficult to clearly see following scenes which are too dark. It’s not particularly original and the twist is fairly obvious from the beginning but that doesn’t make it unwatchable.

This movie has a low score on IMDB and I think it’s slightly undeserved. Many people will be put off by the religious storyline – a town is experiencing the Biblical plagues – but that’s doing a disservice to the film. It’s a solid thriller, with good performances from the cast, albeit with some interesting director and editing decisions.

Throwback Thursday: Interview for SFF

Last year I was interviewed with Adele for SFF World as part of our launch of Fennec Books, the imprint of Fox Spirit Books, for whom I’m commissioning editor. Our first book, Ghoulsome Graveyard (written by me) is already available, and our next book, which I commissioned, will be out soon. It was such an interesting and exciting project to read submissions and choose the novel I really enjoyed and to work with such a gifted writer. I can’t wait for you to read more about what were doing. In the meantime, check out our interview here.

Movie review: The Horde (La Horde) (2009)

The Horde 2009.jpg

Synopsis: The zombie apocalypse has arrived, trapping a group of crooked police, gangsters and the undead in a high-rise tower block, they must join forces if they are to survive, but is death really a more viable option than working with the enemy?

Director: Yannick Dahan & Benjamin Rocher

Starring: Claude Perron, Jean-Pierre Martins, Eriq Ebouaney

Review: There’s been a lot of zombie movies and TV shows recently but in my opinion this is one of the best. I know foreign movies aren’t for everybody but this is a well scripted and acted movie that means it’s well worth sticking with the subtitles.

The characters are all standout, although not particularly likeable and well crafted with their individual arcs played out. The action is good and zombie make up is well done. There’s a few cliches of course but overall it’s an excellent movie.

Inspiration for Weird Wild

Weird-Wild

My collection of short stories, Weird Wild, was published on 20 March 2014. The first story I wrote for it was called ‘The Lake’ and was written as part of an online writing challenge. I didn’t know then what it would grow into!

My book babies, out in the wild!

I’ve always loved the woods. There’s nothing more relaxing than walking through forests, unless you’re being chased by a werewolf! We’ve visited forests in the UK, including ‘Wistman’s Wood’ in Dartmoor, as well as rainforests in Latin America and Asia and all helped inspire ‘Weird Wild’, with creepy mists, crooked trees and hidden dens.

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Wistman’s Wood, Dartmoor

The Stone Circle in Weird Wild is definitely inspired by my love of archaeology. I love Stonehenge and have been fascinated by stone circles, both in terms of what they tell us about our ancestors, but also the more mystical elements. My logical, scientific brain (and a number of my tutors!) debunked the idea of ley lines but there’s still something magical about these stones. Who’s to say they aren’t portals to the fairy realm?

Stonehenge. I visited it while studying and the image of the stones rising from the earth has stayed with me. Magical

How pretty are bluebells? It was an annual tradition growing up to visit ‘Bluebell Woods’ and see them when they bloomed each spring. I was fascinated to learn some of the more nefarious uses of this beautiful, if deadly, bell. I’d also never claim to be a poet, but the poem for Weird Wild was written fairly quickly, the voices and the bells ringing clearly.

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Bluebells near where I grew up.

 

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Dartmoor, UK

So many beautiful lakes inspired ‘The Lake’. Whilst Lago Roja in Bolivia isn’t surrounded by trees like the lake in Weird Wild, the stillness and sense of isolation crept into the story.

Lago Roja, Bolivia. It was so peaceful and ethereal here

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Out in the wild!

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As always, any sticky plot points were worked out during long walks. There’s something about being outside which definitely clears the fog and helps the writing process.

Check out those wild flowers!

 

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You can get your copy of Weird Wild from Amazon, or contact me below for a signed copy!